Footprint of the food we eat

I came across this interesting article on the greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of the food we eat, recently published by the World Economic Forum. This is particularly interesting as it focuses on fresh produce, and less on processed foods.

The summary infographic is below. As usual, vegetarians can rejoice in their lower GHG footprint.  But the dairy question remains unanswered.  Cattle have very high footprint, so why is milk shown with low footprint?  This is important to ask because India has the largest number of cattle in the world.

 

ghg-carbon-footprint-food-we-eatghg-carbon-footprint-food-we-eat

 

 

Full link: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/12/your-kitchen-and-the-planet-the-impact-of-our-food-on-the-environment

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Agriculture and farming, Food and nutrition, sustainability and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Footprint of the food we eat

  1. Babu says:

    Richa,

    Good article. You point out a very interesting irregularity in the data. Milk should be right up there. I’m not a cynic, but this kind of data presentation makes me wonder who was funding the research, and how neutral were the investigators…

  2. Richa says:

    Yes. I have to dig further to see if in the US dairy cattle and beef cattle are different species or reared differently. Also, isn’t it interesting how methodological decisions for analysis can incorporate people’s biases?

  3. Ramoo says:

    The above data sets come from intensive stall fed cattle. so when ecological foot prints are calculated, we need to calculate the ecological foot print of the feeds on. on the contrary, in Indian situation the data would be very different. for example 90% of the cattle or the beef produced in india is from cattle which is on grazing and are not stall fed. it is more of a recycling of the crop residues. similarly methane emissions are when the dung is thrown out….in India most of it is used in farming which reduce the use of nitrogenous and other chemical fertilisers so by improving the composting process, the foot prints can be greatly be reduced ramoo.csa

    On Sun, Feb 12, 2017 at 8:25 AM, Stirring the Pyramid wrote:

    > Richa posted: “I came across this interesting article on the greenhouse > gas (GHG) footprint of the food we eat, recently published by the World > Economic Forum. This is particularly interesting as it focuses on fresh > produce, and less on processed foods. The summary inf” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s